Samuel Barrett's Publications

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Collaboration in Ad Hoc Teamwork: Ambiguous Tasks, Roles, and Communication

Jonathan Grizou, Samuel Barrett, Manuel Lopes, and Peter Stone. Collaboration in Ad Hoc Teamwork: Ambiguous Tasks, Roles, and Communication. In AAMAS Adaptive Learning Agents (ALA) Workshop, May 2016.

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Abstract

Creating autonomous agents capable of cooperating with previously unfamiliar teammates, known as "ad hoc teamwork," has been identified as an important challenge for multiagent systems. Previous research has assumed that either the task, the role of each agent, or the communication protocol among agents is known before the interaction begins. We consider these three variables simultaneously and show how an ad hoc agent can fit into a new team while handling ambiguous tasks, roles, and communication protocols. We assume a known distribution of possible tasks, roles, and communication protocols. We present experimental results in the pursuit domain showing that our ad hoc agent can join such a team while barely impacting the overall performance compared to a pre-coordinated agent.

BibTeX

@InProceedings{ALA16-grizou,
  author="Jonathan Grizou and  Samuel Barrett and Manuel Lopes and Peter Stone",
  title="Collaboration in Ad Hoc Teamwork: Ambiguous Tasks, Roles, and Communication",
  booktitle = {AAMAS Adaptive Learning Agents (ALA) Workshop},
  location = {Singapore},
  month = {May},
  year = {2016},
  abstract = {
             Creating autonomous agents capable of cooperating with
             previously unfamiliar teammates, known as "ad hoc
             teamwork," has been identified as an important challenge
             for multiagent systems.  Previous research has assumed
             that either the task, the role of each agent, or the
             communication protocol among agents is known before the
             interaction begins. We consider these three variables
             simultaneously and show how an ad hoc agent can fit into
             a new team while handling ambiguous tasks, roles, and
             communication protocols. We assume a known distribution
             of possible tasks, roles, and communication protocols. We
             present experimental results in the pursuit domain
             showing that our ad hoc agent can join such a team while
             barely impacting the overall performance compared to a
             pre-coordinated agent.
  },
  Bib2html_pubtype = {Refereed Workshop/Symposium},
}

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